Monarch Fire District - Proposition F

To Modernize Your Critical Infrastructure

Built in 1970

For the next 50 years

What is Prop F?

The Monarch Fire Protection District’s current infrastructure is aging and needs to be modernized through rebuilding, redesign, or repurchase. Modern fire stations are considered Critical Infrastructure within their communities and should align with current space requirements to properly house apparatus and personnel, as well as up-to-date technologies that facilitate rapid emergency response. Additionally, emergency response vehicles continually evolve with industry standards as greater demands are placed upon them in the modern age.

The District’s House 2 and House 3 have been falling behind in meeting space and technology requirements and this continues at an accelerated pace. The proposed new structures will be designed to meet today’s needs for rapid response, housing of more complicated and multi-faceted response equipment, enhanced security and safety of your emergency response personnel, with enhancements to include fitness areas and training rooms needed for firefighting and EMS training.

Additionally, emergency response vehicles incur greater maintenance costs as they age, and as greater call volumes are placed upon them. In order to combat this, the District is now emphasizing adherence to the National Fire Protection Association standards on equipment replacement. Our replacement schedule facilitates the greatest equipment efficiency without surpassing a cost-effective serviceable life of front-line apparatus, while ensuring our current insurance rating for our citizens.

In order to complete these much-needed improvements, the Monarch Fire Protection District will be placing a $14.9 million General Obligation Bond Issue on the April 7, 2020 ballot. The District estimates the bond will enable the repayment of the principal through a $0.07 tax levy.

Background

The Monarch Fire Protection District began serving west St. Louis County homes and businesses in 1925 as a volunteer department operating one firetruck from a gas station. The District has come a long way since then, initially operating as the Chesterfield Fire District, with a name change to Monarch in 2003. The first permanent station was built in the early 1960s. The current House 2, on Wildhorse Creek Road, was built in 1970, followed by a station on Olive, near Fee Fee (current House #3) a few years later. Since that time two additional stations were added in the 1980s (House #1 and House #5) followed by the newest station in 2006 (House #4). Fire stations have an expected life expectancy of 45-50 years for a number of reasons, including the ongoing, constant wear and tear from heavy firetrucks and ambulances along with five to nine employees inhabiting, training and coming and going from the buildings, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and the ever changing space requirements for larger apparatus capable of ever-improving fire, EMS and rescue functions.

Regular ongoing maintenance, similar to what home and business owners face, takes place in all fire/EMS stations. Expensive HVAC, plumbing, electrical, structural, parking and landscaping and cooking systems are repaired and replaced as required. The ever- increasing costs of these repairs is expected and budgeted, but as the building structures continue to age, the mounting costs become difficult to justify and many times end up being temporary solutions to the underlying problem of the buildings having exceeded their life expectancy.

The Chief advised the Board of Directors to begin planning for replacing these stations about four (4) years ago and the initial response was to keep patching what we had to continue to extend the life of the buildings. But major remodeling and structural projects costing hundreds of thousands of dollars over the years have been failing sooner and the Board became convinced of the need for replacing our oldest stations. Monarch currently operates the oldest and second oldest stations in west St. Louis County with limitations on the size and number of life safety apparatus.

Last year the Board commissioned a study of options available and developed a Needs Assessment & Alternatives model that was used to make the decision to proceed with Proposition F.

Needs Assessment & Alternatives

Last year the Board of Directors authorized the formation of a Steering Committee to look into formalizing the potential needs and associated costs for a bond issue. Director Jean Millner was appointed to this Committee with the task of forming a group with diverse knowledge of the current conditions and future needs of the District. Director Millner was eminently qualified for this job as she had recently led the District’s update to its medium and long-range planning process. Director Millner then appointed Assistant Chief Les Crews and Controller Depew to serve as Co-Chairs of the Steering Committee and together they chose the rest of the members, consisting of Command Officers and Company Officers. The Steering Committee began meeting in July 2019.

One of the first steps in the process of assessing the needs was to engage the services of a professional architectural firm. They chose FGM architects as this firm has extensive experience in the St. Louis area designing and overseeing the construction of numerous fire stations additions, remodels, replacements and construction of new station houses. FGM was hired and officially began work on this project in September 2019.

The Steering Committee, along with representatives from FGM, met bi-weekly, looking at such things as the current location of stations, ISO (Insurance Standards Organization) ratings, age and current physical condition of existing stations, 1, 2, 3 and 5. An information gathering questionnaire was used by the Steering Committee, in coordination with the station Captains of each fire house, to learn as much as possible about what is right and what is wrong with these buildings that were constructed five decades earlier. As needs were identified, they began to prioritize them, in an effort to narrow the list of what had to be done now, versus what could be delayed into the future. As would be expected, the initial wish list of unlimited needs was reviewed closely by the Committee and prioritized for presentation to the Board of Directors.

A formal presentation took place at a Board Meeting in early November, at which time representatives of FGM Architects presented their analysis of all station projects they recommended be done and the Steering Committee presented an analysis of equipment needs, which was primarily a schedule of replacing fire trucks that are approaching the end of their useful life expectancy. FGM provided the Board with their study objectives, which included sizes of each area of each station, such as sleeping quarters, living quarters, firetruck and ambulance bays, offices, kitchen areas and storage. FGM analyzed additional information, such as property grading, existing utilities (Station #2 has well water and a septic system) and stormwater handling. The results of the study objectives were then used to provide test fits on the land footprint and cost analysis.

Among the many questions members of the Board of Directors asked was the expected cost of various station sizes and designs. The Board stated it was interested in modest stations that would house their current fire trucks and ambulances with an additional eye towards future needs on a 50-year projection. The Board was very clear that while it did not want to cut corners with construction methods and materials, it also had no interest in extravagant and costly designs. The architects followed up with information about fire stations they had recently designed and the associated construction costs, in order to provide a range of costs to the Board. The Board determined the total cost of over $25M, including a major remodeling of Stations #1 and #5, replacement of Stations #2 and #3 and funding fire truck and ambulance replacements for a ten-year schedule, exceeded the upper limit of the Board’s expectations and desires. The Steering Committee was sent back to work to reduce the project to only include the highest priority needs.

In early January 2020, the Steering Committee returned with a pared down version that came in at $14.9M and included the replacement of Stations #2 and #3 and a truck schedule to replace a 2002 fire truck and two others that would also be nearly 20 years old at their time of replacement. The Board of Directors accepted this revised project as it will enhance the District’s ability to fulfill its’ mandate to provide fire, EMS and rescue services. On January 30, 2020, in a unanimous decision, the Board of Directors voted to place Proposition F on the April 7, 2020 ballot, for a bond issue to fund these important projects.

What will be funded?

OVERVIEW:

  • Monarch Fire Protection District House #2 will be replaced in 2021

  • Monarch Fire Protection District House #3 will be replaced in 2022

  • Ladder Truck 2212 will be replaced in 2022

  • Ladder Truck 2242 will be replaced in 2024

  • Pumper/Rescue Truck 2224 will be replaced in 2026

DETAILS:

HOUSE #2

Location: ​18424 Wildhorse Creek Rd.
Size: ​​12,900 SF (3 bays, double deep)
Budget: ​Fire House 2 – $5,700,000

Description:

The existing House 2 was constructed in 1970 with an addition built in 1996. The original house was constructed to accommodate three personnel, which has since increased to a minimum of four personnel per shift. The site requires inefficient back-in style bays and provides minimal on-site parking. The current undersized facility will not accommodate forecasted personnel and equipment expansion. Additionally, the current site requires constant investment to support site and building systems, maintain building exterior integrity and lacks industry standard operational efficiencies, living quarters sizes, technology and security elements. The building is not connected to water or sewer service and depends on well water and a septic system.

The proposed new House 2 will feature expanded apparatus bays and be constructed to provide safe and efficient on-site circulation, parking, and proper placement of the fire house facility. Functional living quarters with gender neutral bunk and restroom components, fitness, dayroom, kitchen, decontamination, gear storage, and technology/security elements will be provided to enhance staff response and create a professional environment. The facility will be 100% code compliant and constructed to essential services facility standards. Training components will be built into the site, reducing the amount of time personnel must train off-site; all the while, serving as a controlled reclamation and green-space enhancement function.

The proposed facility will provide:

• Greater utility efficiency.
• Fully fire-sprinkler the entire facility.
• Negative ventilation gear storage room.
• Decontamination area adjacent to apparatus bay.
• Toilet facilities adjacent to apparatus bay.
• ADA compliant public restroom.
• Staff training/study area.
• Individual, gender neutral bunk rooms.
• Additional restrooms / showers to support crew size.
• Properly sized living quarters.
• Increased storage and maintenance space.
• Security hardware and cameras.
• Improved efficiency of Mechanical/Electrical systems.
• Apparatus exhaust system upgrades.
• High efficiency lighting format.
• Upgrades to data, phone, dispatching and information systems.

HOUSE #3
Location: ​1201 Fernview Dr.
Size: ​​12,900 SF (3 bays, double deep)
Budget: ​Fire House 3 – $5,600,000

Description:

The existing House 3 was constructed in 1974 with an addition built in 1999. After the addition, the house accommodates two front-line apparatus and a maximum of six personnel. The site requires inefficient back-in style bays, will not accommodate equipment expansion, and provides inadequate on-site parking for community guests. Additionally, the current site requires constant investment to support site and internal/external building systems, and lacks industry standard operational efficiencies, living quarters sizes, technology and security elements.

The proposed new House 3 will feature expanded apparatus bays and be constructed to provide safe and efficient on-site circulation, parking, and proper placement of the fire house facility. Functional living quarters with gender neutral bunk and restroom components, fitness, dayroom, kitchen, decontamination, gear storage, and technology/security elements will be provided to enhance staff response and create a professional environment. The facility will be 100% code compliant and constructed to essential services facility standards.

The proposed facility will provide:

• Greater utility efficiency.
• Fully fire-sprinkler the entire facility.
• Negative ventilation gear storage room.
• Decontamination area adjacent to apparatus bay.
• Toilet facilities adjacent to apparatus bay.
• ADA compliant public restroom.
• Staff training/study area.
• Individual, gender neutral bunk rooms.
• Additional restrooms / showers to support crew size.
• Enlarged living quarters.
• Increased storage and maintenance space.
• Security hardware and cameras.
• Improved efficiency of Mechanical/Electrical systems.
• Apparatus exhaust system upgrades.
• High efficiency lighting format.
• Upgrades to data, phone, dispatching and information systems.

LADDER TRUCK 2212
Apparatus: (proposed) 100’ Straight Ladder
Year: 2022 (new construction)
Proposed budget: $1,200,000

The current 2212 is a 2012 E-One 78’ Straight Ladder located at House 1. It was purchased in October of 2012 and has currently logged 66,932 miles. Replacing this apparatus will allow the District to retire the reserve (back-up) Ladder Platform and place the current apparatus into reserve status. The current Reserve apparatus is a 2002 Pierce 85’ Platform.

With call volumes ever rising, this apparatus is past its cost-effective life for our community. Retiring this apparatus will provide significant maintenance cost savings. The new 2212 will remain at House 1, a centralized location within the District to best serve our larger, taller structures. Additionally, this location will maintain the District’s current ISO rating, which potentially offers significant insurance cost savings to all.

LADDER TRUCK 2242
Apparatus: (proposed) 100’ Platform
Year: 2024 (new construction)
Proposed budget: $1,300,000

The current 2242 is a 2014 E-One 95’ Platform located at House 4. It was purchased in February of 2015 and has currently logged 41,860 miles. Replacing this apparatus in 2024, with an anticipated 75,000 miles, will allow the District to retire the proposed reserve (back-up) Straight Ladder and place the current apparatus into reserve status. The proposed Reserve apparatus would be the District’s current 2012 E-One 78’ Ladder.

Placing the 2014 E-One 95’ Platform into Reserve status would re-align the District with the National Fire Protection Association’s recommendations for apparatus serving in front-line and reserve status. This apparatus could remain in reserve for five years and generate greater potential savings in maintenance costs over that time.

The new 2242 will remain at House 4, also a centralized location, to best serve our larger, taller structures. Additionally, this location will complement the District’s current ISO rating, which potentially offers significant insurance cost savings for residents and businesses.

PUMPER RESCUE TRUCK 2224
Apparatus: Rescue Pumper
Year: 2026 (new construction)
Proposed budget: $800,000

 The current 2224 is a 2016 Smeal Rescue Pumper located at House 2. It was purchased in December of 2015 and has currently logged 35,278 miles. Replacing this apparatus in 2026, with an anticipated 75,000 miles, will allow the District to retire the reserve (back-up) 2010 Pierce Rescue Pumper and place the current apparatus into reserve status.

Placing the 2016 Smeal Rescue Pumper into Reserve status and retiring the 2010 Pierce Rescue Pumper would re-align the District with the National Fire Protection Association’s recommendations for apparatus serving in front-line and reserve status. Following this schedule will accommodate the 10-year front-line, 2-year reserve long-term plan for all of the District’s Rescue Pumpers. Additionally, the plan anticipates generating greater potential savings in maintenance costs over that time.

The new 2224 will remain at House 2 and be constructed and equipped for the suburban interface that is particular to the House 2 service area. Additionally, it will meet or exceed specifications set forth in the National Fire Protection Association’s recommendations for Rescue Pumpers and will complement the District’s low ISO rating, which offers significant insurance cost savings to all our community partners.

Financial Details

House #2 Replacement
$5,700,000
House #3 Replacement
$5,600,000
Ladder Truck 2212 Replacement
$1,200,000
Ladder Truck 2242 Replacement
$1,300,000
Pumper/Rescue 2224 Replacement
$ 800,000
Professional Services
$ 200,000
Relocation Expenses
$ 100,000
Calculate Your Costs

FAQ

What is the actual ballot language that will appear when I go to vote on April 7?

Shall the Monarch Fire Protection District of St. Louis County, Missouri issue its general obligation bonds in the amount of Fourteen Million Nine Hundred Thousand Dollars ($14.9 million) for the purpose of purchasing property and constructing, furnishing and equipping fire stations thereon to save lives and property, renovating, improving, furnishing and equipping existing facilities, acquiring and equipping new and replacement fire fighting vehicles, life-saving ambulances, apparatus and auxiliary equipment to meet current safety standards, and refinancing outstanding lease obligations?

How does a Bond work?

A municipal bond is essentially a loan. It is a way for governmental entities to borrow money and have that money paid back by property taxes. In this instance, it requires a vote of the people to ask for a revenue stream to support those repayment amounts.

The Monarch Fire Protection District is asking for a general obligation bond issue to be repaid through a property tax levy. If the proposition passes, the District expects to issue the initial bonds in August of 2020.  The tax would appear on the fall 2020 tax bill, which is due on December 31, 2020.

Municipal bonds are tax exempt, which helps in lowering interest rates on the borrowed amount. General obligation bonds issues need a 57.14% voter approval to be passed.

The longest term that can be asked for in a general obligation bond is 20 years; however, the District will be pursuing repayment in 10 years, thus keeping compounded interest as small as possible. Bonds are sold in increments of $5,000. Interest is paid semi-annually, and principal is repaid one time per year. Typically, March and September are interest repayment dates and March is the principal repayment date.

The state of Missouri limits a Fire District’s outstanding debt to 5% of the District’s total Assessed Valuation on a general obligation bond issue.

The District estimates the bond would require a levy of $0.07 per $100.00 assessed value. For example, a home with an appraised value of $100,000 would have an assessed value of $19,000 (in accordance with St. Louis County assessment procedures). The resultant tax would equal $13.30 per year for this general obligation bond. Alternatively, one penny of a tax levy is equivalent to a $1.90 tax increase per year. Based on a debt service levy of $0.07 the math works out in such a way that $13.30 would be the cost per year for a home with an appraised value of $100,000 and an assessed value of $19,000.

Once bonds are approved, the process is typically 8-10 weeks before projects may commence.

How is this different than a tax increase?

While taxes are used to repay the bond, including investor return, over a period of time, the tax used for this purpose has a defined end point. In this case, the District estimates the tax to repay this bond will end after 10 years or earlier, but in no case longer than 20 years. The last time the Monarch Fire District had a voter approved 10-year bond repayment schedule, the repayment was completed in just over 8 years. This served to eliminate the specific debt service tax associated with the bond. By statute, the District must end the debt service tax when the bond has been fully repaid.

Can anyone buy the tax-free bonds that will fund this bond issue?

While the answer is yes, tax-free municipal bonds are very popular investment vehicles and they usually sell out quickly to investors and institutions that regularly make such investments. If you are interested in owning these bonds you should let your broker know to be on the lookout for them when they go on sale. And keep in mind that the District may actually issue a portion of the bonds now and another portion in the future. Your broker is your best source of information about this.

Can the District use the bonds for anything it wants, including paying day-to-day expenses?

By statute, the bond proceeds may only be used for the express purposes stated in the ballot language. Bond proceeds are always used for capital purchases, meaning they can never go to pay worker wages, office expenses or other operational expenses.

Who do I contact for more information?

Questions should be directed to Fire Chief Cary Spiegel at 314-514-0900 X2200 or spiegel.c@monarchfpd.org. Chief Spiegel can answer many questions and if needed, refer you to specific experts to answer your questions that pertain to Proposition F. In addition, there will be several public Town Hall style meetings to be held in March at which District officials will present detailed information about Proposition F and answer questions. Dates, times and locations will be announced on this web site by late February.

Press Release

Board of Directors
Robin Harris, President
Jean Millner, Secretary
Rick Gans, Treasurer
 
 

Fire Chief
Cary Spiegel
 
 
 

Chesterfield, MO-The Monarch Fire Protection District Board of Directors voted unanimously to seek voter approval for a bond issue to appear on the April 7, 2020 ballot for residents of the District. This is the culmination of a six-month process that assessed the condition of the District’s facilities and emergency vehicles to meet the current and future needs of the District.

Considerations included the age of two original fire and EMS stations that are, respectively, more than 46 and 50 years old. Despite the fact that each has been extensively renovated and updated over the years, structural issues are causing significant maintenance costs with short term solutions to ongoing problems. Additional issues include the fact that today’s firetrucks and ambulances are significantly larger than those which existed when these stations were built, causing clearance and fit issues in these older stations. Finally, the number of EMS and fire/rescue calls has more than doubled since 2009 from about 4,000 annual calls to more than 8,000 calls in 2019, causing substantially more wear and tear on front line response trucks.

Fire Chief and 40-year Monarch veteran, Cary Spiegel, informed the Board in 2018 that these costs would need to be addressed in the near future. While the Board sought temporary solutions, they determined the time has come to address them before they can have a negative impact on providing life-saving responses in the District.

Plans include replacing Fire Station #2 and Fire Station #3 over the coming years with modern structures that will meet the District’s needs in those areas for several decades. Funds will also go to replace two aging fire trucks, starting with a 2002 ladder truck that is years past its recommended and ordinary lifespan.

The District last sought approval for a bond issue in 2004, which passed by a wide margin. That bond issue was repaid in 2012. The estimated cost for the owner of a $300,000 home will be a little more than $3.00 per month. The bond will have a 10-year payoff.

The Monarch Fire Protection District covers most of Chesterfield and parts of Wildwood, Creve Coeur, Clarkson Valley, St. Louis County, Maryland Heights and Ballwin.

Overview

OVERVIEW:

  • Monarch Fire Protection District House #2 will be replaced in 2021

  • Monarch Fire Protection District House #3 will be replaced in 2022

  • Ladder Truck 2212 will be replaced in 2022

  • Ladder Truck 2242 will be replaced in 2024

  • Pumper/Rescue Truck 2224 will be replaced in 2026

HOUSE #2

Location: ​18424 Wildhorse Creek Rd.
Size: ​​12,900 SF (3 bays, double deep)
Budget: ​Fire House 2 – $5,700,000

Description:

The existing House 2 was constructed in 1970 with an addition built in 1996. The original house was constructed to accommodate three personnel, which has since increased to a minimum of four personnel per shift. The site requires inefficient back-in style bays and provides minimal on-site parking. The current undersized facility will not accommodate forecasted personnel and equipment expansion. Additionally, the current site requires constant investment to support site and building systems, maintain building exterior integrity and lacks industry standard operational efficiencies, living quarters sizes, technology and security elements. The building is not connected to water or sewer service and depends on well water and a septic system.

The proposed new House 2 will feature expanded apparatus bays and be constructed to provide safe and efficient on-site circulation, parking, and proper placement of the fire house facility. Functional living quarters with gender neutral bunk and restroom components, fitness, dayroom, kitchen, decontamination, gear storage, and technology/security elements will be provided to enhance staff response and create a professional environment. The facility will be 100% code compliant and constructed to essential services facility standards. Training components will be built into the site, reducing the amount of time personnel must train off-site; all the while, serving as a controlled reclamation and green-space enhancement function.

The proposed facility will provide:

• Greater utility efficiency.
• Fully fire-sprinkler the entire facility.
• Negative ventilation gear storage room.
• Decontamination area adjacent to apparatus bay.
• Toilet facilities adjacent to apparatus bay.
• ADA compliant public restroom.
• Staff training/study area.
• Individual, gender neutral bunk rooms.
• Additional restrooms / showers to support crew size.
• Properly sized living quarters.
• Increased storage and maintenance space.
• Security hardware and cameras.
• Improved efficiency of Mechanical/Electrical systems.
• Apparatus exhaust system upgrades.
• High efficiency lighting format.
• Upgrades to data, phone, dispatching and information systems.

HOUSE #3

Location: ​1201 Fernview Dr.
Size: ​​12,900 SF (3 bays, double deep)
Budget: ​Fire House 3 – $5,600,000

Description:

The existing House 3 was constructed in 1974 with an addition built in 1999. After the addition, the house accommodates two front-line apparatus and a maximum of six personnel. The site requires inefficient back-in style bays, will not accommodate equipment expansion, and provides inadequate on-site parking for community guests. Additionally, the current site requires constant investment to support site and internal/external building systems, and lacks industry standard operational efficiencies, living quarters sizes, technology and security elements.

The proposed new House 3 will feature expanded apparatus bays and be constructed to provide safe and efficient on-site circulation, parking, and proper placement of the fire house facility. Functional living quarters with gender neutral bunk and restroom components, fitness, dayroom, kitchen, decontamination, gear storage, and technology/security elements will be provided to enhance staff response and create a professional environment. The facility will be 100% code compliant and constructed to essential services facility standards.

The proposed facility will provide:

• Greater utility efficiency.
• Fully fire-sprinkler the entire facility.
• Negative ventilation gear storage room.
• Decontamination area adjacent to apparatus bay.
• Toilet facilities adjacent to apparatus bay.
• ADA compliant public restroom.
• Staff training/study area.
• Individual, gender neutral bunk rooms.
• Additional restrooms / showers to support crew size.
• Enlarged living quarters.
• Increased storage and maintenance space.
• Security hardware and cameras.
• Improved efficiency of Mechanical/Electrical systems.
• Apparatus exhaust system upgrades.
• High efficiency lighting format.
• Upgrades to data, phone, dispatching and information systems.

LADDER TRUCK 2212

Apparatus: (proposed) 100’ Straight Ladder
Year: 2022 (new construction)
Proposed budget: $1,200,000

The current 2212 is a 2012 E-One 78’ Straight Ladder located at House 1. It was purchased in October of 2012 and has currently logged 66,932 miles. Replacing this apparatus will allow the District to retire the reserve (back-up) Ladder Platform and place the current apparatus into reserve status. The current Reserve apparatus is a 2002 Pierce 85’ Platform.

With call volumes ever rising, this apparatus is past its cost-effective life for our community. Retiring this apparatus will provide significant maintenance cost savings. The new 2212 will remain at House 1, a centralized location within the District to best serve our larger, taller structures. Additionally, this location will maintain the District’s current ISO rating, which potentially offers significant insurance cost savings to all.

LADDER TRUCK 2242

Apparatus: (proposed) 100’ Platform
Year: 2024 (new construction)
Proposed budget: $1,300,000

The current 2242 is a 2014 E-One 95’ Platform located at House 4. It was purchased in February of 2015 and has currently logged 41,860 miles. Replacing this apparatus in 2024, with an anticipated 75,000 miles, will allow the District to retire the proposed reserve (back-up) Straight Ladder and place the current apparatus into reserve status. The proposed Reserve apparatus would be the District’s current 2012 E-One 78’ Ladder.

Placing the 2014 E-One 95’ Platform into Reserve status would re-align the District with the National Fire Protection Association’s recommendations for apparatus serving in front-line and reserve status. This apparatus could remain in reserve for five years and generate greater potential savings in maintenance costs over that time.

The new 2242 will remain at House 4, also a centralized location, to best serve our larger, taller structures. Additionally, this location will complement the District’s current ISO rating, which potentially offers significant insurance cost savings for residents and businesses.

PUMPER RESCUE TRUCK

Apparatus: Rescue Pumper
Year: 2026 (new construction)
Proposed budget: $800,000

 The current 2224 is a 2016 Smeal Rescue Pumper located at House 2. It was purchased in December of 2015 and has currently logged 35,278 miles. Replacing this apparatus in 2026, with an anticipated 75,000 miles, will allow the District to retire the reserve (back-up) 2010 Pierce Rescue Pumper and place the current apparatus into reserve status.

Placing the 2016 Smeal Rescue Pumper into Reserve status and retiring the 2010 Pierce Rescue Pumper would re-align the District with the National Fire Protection Association’s recommendations for apparatus serving in front-line and reserve status. Following this schedule will accommodate the 10-year front-line, 2-year reserve long-term plan for all of the District’s Rescue Pumpers. Additionally, the plan anticipates generating greater potential savings in maintenance costs over that time.

The new 2224 will remain at House 2 and be constructed and equipped for the suburban interface that is particular to the House 2 service area. Additionally, it will meet or exceed specifications set forth in the National Fire Protection Association’s recommendations for Rescue Pumpers and will complement the District’s low ISO rating, which offers significant insurance cost savings to all our community partners.